Citi Bike, New York City

Hired by NYC Bike Share (the operators of Citi Bike), a colleague and I redesigned the information displayed on the front of the Citi Bike kiosk.

 

Background

NYC Bike Share approached me and my colleague to improve the user experience of the Citi Bike kiosk installed throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. When they contacted us, NYC Bike Share was happy with their amount of yearly subscribers, but wanted to boost ridership among casual and one time users. As the kiosk is the main point of contact for necessary information about the system, we were asked to explore how to improve the information found there.

Role

I completed this project with one teammate, Amy Wu. As a team of two, we decided to complete all of the work together. Because we were conducting a holistic design process starting with research and finishing with final designs, there was plenty of responsibility to share evenly in order to stay close to the subject and provide support along the way. 

 

Research

It was important to understand how first time and casual users approached the system and where they might get stuck in the process. In order to surface these moments, we performed extensive primary research by observing customers renting a bike for the first time and conducting in person interviews. Through this we discovered what areas of the system were confusing or successful. 

 

Iterative Design

Using our synthesized research we were able to identify how to better organize the information and what visual approach to take when designing it. We grouped the information in various modules that we were able to move around and reorganize depending on what worked best.

 

Testing

Using print outs and questionnaires we tested our designs in the field. We observed users interacting with our designs as well as utilized Citi Bike volunteers to poll users about what wording and design was easiest to understand. 

 

Final Design

We chose a design with illustrations that would easily walk a user through the process regardless of language. We felt that this was necessary in order to keep users engaged as well as appeal to many tourists that come to New York City that speak little or no English. We were able to simplify the design into four main sections: the payment grid, "Getting started", "Returning your bike", and "Ready to ride again?" With these four blocks we allowed users to easily find what section of the process they were on and follow instructions specific to that.

Original design and our redesign

 

Implementation

The design was implemented on 330+ kiosks throughout New York City.